Research

Research Summary

Find The Courage (FTC) ran its FTC Bystander Positive Impact (BPI) Program with 86 sophomore students in December 2012/January 2013. FTC’s co-creator ran the FTC BPI Program during high school health classes over the course of ten class days, for a total of ten lessons. Students in the test group (program group) were pre-tested one month prior to the program (11.18.12), post-tested immediately following the program (1.11.13), two months following the program (3.5.13) and five months after the program (6.11.13). In addition, 96 sophomore students who did not go through the program (control group) were pre and post surveyed with the same surveys given to the program group. The control group was pre-tested one month prior to the start of the program (11.19.12), immediately after the program (1.11.13), two months following the program (2.28.13), and five months after the program (5.29.13).

 

The initial results from the 2012-2013 Find The Courage surveys are encouraging regarding both 1) the positive impact the FTC BPI Program had on students who underwent the program and 2) the behavior in the broader school environment. In addition, we are using the results to modify and improve the program.

 

Peter Golder, market research expert and Professor of Marketing at TUCK School of Business at Dartmouth, continued to provide guidance in FTC’s research methodology and confirmed the statistical significance of these results.

 

Aita Vonceil Romain, New Hampshire’s Upper Valley Regional Substance Misuse Coordinator, assisted by cleaning and transforming the data for final analysis. (Her position is funded by the NH Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Services and the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation with additional resources provided by Dartmouth-Hitchcock).

 

Effect on Participants going through the FTC BPI Program (based on self reports before and after the program):

 

  1. Students learned more strategies to help someone who was being mistreated.1 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.1

 

  1. Students became more comfortable using strategies to help someone who was being mistreated.1 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.1

 

  1. Students became more likely to help someone who was being mistreated.1 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.1

 

  1. Students felt more confident being kind to other students.3

 

  1. Students became more aware of types of mistreatment beyond verbal and physical abuse.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparison between program group and control group after completion of the FTC BPI Program (based on self reports; note that there were no differences between program and control groups prior to the program):

 

  1. Students in the program group were more likely to help someone who was being mistreated than students in the control group.3 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.2

 

  1. Students in the program group were more confident being kind to others than students in the control group.2 This effect was also present five months after the program ended.2

 

  1. Students in the program group were more sensitive to offending someone with a joke than students in the control group.1 This effect was also present five months after the program ended.2

 

 

Effect on environment (based on self reports of control group members only before and after the program):

 

  1. Students in the control group became more likely to help someone who was being mistreated.1 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.1

 

  1. Students in the control group became more likely to see someone help a person who was being mistreated.1 This effect persisted five months after the program ended.1

 

 

1 Significance level: p < 0.01

2 Significance level: p < 0.05

3 Significance level: p < 0.10